Teeny, tiny teacup pigs the perfect present?

Every year puppies are high up on the wish lists that fly off to Santa. But this year Santa might look twice at the hopeful letters as they may not ask for puppies, but piglets – ‘teacup pigs‘ to be precise.

Now, is that a giant teacup or a really tiny pig? (by equestech at photobucket.com)

With their eyes like buttons, their cute little socket-looking noses and their tiny corkscrew tails teacup pigs stand good chances to remove the Chihuahua from the top of the most popular miniature pets in no time.

According to Nydailynews.com they have already become the ‘latest trendy pet in England’.

Even Barney Stintson from ‘How I met your mother‘ has one as his perfect „Do you want to come up and see my…“-bait.

And on the first glance there seems to be nothing wrong with really, really wanting to have a teacup pig around.

Different information about height and weight

According to Jane Croft, a piglet breeder who appeared on NBC’s ‘Today‘ program, they are “highly intelligent and just love to be loved“. Furthermore they are supposed to be very clean.

But she only sells them in pairs for $ 1,100 each as they bore easily. Also she would only give it to people who have time to play with them all day.

Well, that doesn’t explain why Harry Potter star Rupert Grint (Ron Weasley) was able to buy a pair of piglets…

But as cute as they might be, there are warnings being issued about the little fellows from all over the place.

Wikipedia warns that some breeders purposely feed less food to their pigs to make them look smaller. That would delude possible owners about the size these pigs will grow up to.

While Jane Croft claims we’re talking about 12 to 16 inches and a weight of 65 pounds (“a small spaniel“), Wikipedia claims that we’re rather dealing with a full grown oinking Labrador Retriever.

Pig are still farm animals

Even though there are different information about the final height and weight out there, London’s Metro newspaper points out that pigs are still farm animals – by law.

Therefore they are subject to disease control measures and regulations as any other livestock, the Environment Department (Defra) told the Metro.

The British agriculture minister James Paice told people to ‘pop along a petting farm if they want to see mini creatures’. He also said in the Metro interview that he had heard stories of teacup pigs outgrowing their homes.

Anyways, as much as you would love to have one or two of the teacup-tiny pets around, you should probably stick to wishing for a puppy.

But you could always start referring to your kids as ‘teacup humans’ as the America TV series ‘True blood‘ funnily has (see video here.)

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3 Responses to Teeny, tiny teacup pigs the perfect present?

  1. amanda says:

    i would love a tea cup pig but wait do they get the size of a regular pig or no because if they stay small thats fine

    • Hi Amanda,

      sorry that it took me so long to reply.
      As I say in the text: the original teacup pigs dont really get big.
      But there are many ppl that call the piglet teacup pigs and they grow into propper pigs. Also: did u read that part about the legal farm animal status they have – u might have a lot of hassle…

      Let me know if u decided to get one.

      Cheers,
      Steffi

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